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How to Open Older QuarkXPress Documents

| April 16, 2018 | Matthias Guenther

How do you open QuarkXPress documents that you have maybe created ten years ago or even in the early 90’s?

If you are using QuarkXPress 9 (or below) that’s not an issue, as QuarkXPress 9 opens all previous files from version 3 to 9.

However with version 10, QuarkXPress has cut some fat and removed the legacy technology (e.g. the non-Unicode type engines) of QuarkXPress 6 and below. Remember, with version 7 QuarkXPress introduced OpenType and Unicode, smoothly rendered type display, glyphs that could hang outside the text box, basically everything you don’t want to miss nowadays anymore.

So how do you open older QuarkXPress documents with QuarkXPress 10 or QuarkXPress 2015 or newer?

If your document was last saved with version 7, 8 or 9, it’s no problem you can just open them directly. However, what of you still have documents last saved in version 6 or even v3?

Then the QuarkXPress Document Converter comes to the rescue. It basically is version of QuarkXPress 9 without user interface. It opens older documents, version 3.1, 4, 5 or 6, and resaves them in the version 9 format. And then QuarkXPress 10 and 2015 can open the converted document.

Even better, if you have a bunch of documents, then QuarkXPress Document Converter can batch convert them:

QDC_10

(just use the right button to point it to the folder with subfolders that contains your QuarkXPress documents)

QuarkXPress Document Converter will not overwrite your files, instead it will create a copy, so that your original file stays untouched.

And of course QuarkXPress Document Converter is free of charge and runs on OS X and Windows, up to El Capitan and Windows 10. Download the QuarkXPress Document Converter.

Please note that if you are using a file extension to classify your files, then the correct file extension for QuarkXPress 3, 4 and 5 documents is .qxd, for QuarkXPress 6 it is .qxp. Otherwise the QuarkXPress Document Converter might not recognize the file correctly.

Bottomline:

You are using QuarkXPress 9 (or below)?

You are using QuarkXPress 10 (or higher)?

Future versions of QuarkXPress

QuarkXPress 7 was the first version of QuarkXPress that uses a modern type engine (Unicode, OpenType), that’s why we decided to make the cut to not incorporate the old type engine in modern versions of QuarkXPress.

Good news are that going forward this means that also future versions of QuarkXPress – like for example QuarkXPress 2016 or QuarkXPress 2018 – will continue to be able to open documents from QuarkXPress 7 or newer.

The Non-Rental Suite for Creative Pros

| March 21, 2018 | Matthias Guenther

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Many people have asked me whether there are high-quality tools available for creative professionals other than the rental suite of Adobe Creative Cloud.

I leave it up to you whether you prefer renting a software suite or whether you like to keep/own your tools (the license, that is).

For me, the model of “software vendor adds features and time savers into software – user decides whether it’s worth the purchase/upgrade” just feels to be more fair than “continue paying vendor as long as you use software and if you stop paying you can’t open your work files anymore.”

So here are my personal recommendations for high-quality tools that do not force you to rent:

Illustrations
Renting: Adobe Illustrator
Perpetual: Affinity Designer, CorelDRAW (Win only), Gravit Designer, Sketch (Mac only)

Image Editing
Renting: Adobe Photoshop
Perpetual: Acorn (Mac only), Affinity Photo, PhotoLine

Motion Graphics
Renting: Adobe After Effects
Perpetual: Motion (Mac only), Fusion

Music Production
Renting: Adobe Audition
Perpetual: BandLab (Windows only), GarageBand (macOS and iOS only), Waveform

Page Layout/Design
Renting: Adobe InDesign
Perpetual: QuarkXPress

PDF Touch Up
Renting: Adobe Acrobat
Perpetual: pdfToolbox

Prototyping
Renting: Adobe XD
Perpetual: Lunacy (Win only), Sketch (Mac only)

RAW Editor
Renting: Adobe Lightroom
Perpetual: Capture One, DxO PhotoLab, ON1 Photo RAW

Video Editing
Renting: Adobe Premiere Pro
Perpetual: DaVinci Resolve, Final Cut Pro (Mac only)

Web Design/Web Animations
Renting: Adobe Muse
Perpetual: Hype (Mac only)

Web Editor/Websites
Renting: Adobe Dreamweaver/Adobe Muse
Perpetual: BlueGriffon, Hype (Mac only), Pinegrow

And of course, this is just a personal preference — there are many others.

Which tools are you recommending and using?

= = = = = = = = = =

URLs (as of May 2018):

Acorn: flyingmeat.com/acorn
Affinity Designer: affinity.serif.com/en-gb/designer
Affinity Photo: affinity.serif.com/en-gb/photo
BandLab: bandlab.com
BlueGriffon: bluegriffon.org
Capture One: phaseone.com/captureone
CorelDRAW: coreldraw.com
DaVinci Resolve: blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve
DxO PhotoLab: dxo.com/us/photography/photo-software/dxo-photolab
Final Cut Pro: apple.com/final-cut-pro
Fusion: blackmagicdesign.com/products/fusion
GarageBand: apple.com/mac/garageband
Gravit Designer: designer.io
Hype: tumult.com/hype
Lunacy: icons8.de/lunacy
pdfToolbox: callassoftware.com/en/products/pdftoolbox
Motion: itunes.apple.com/app/motion/id434290957?mt=12
Pinegrow: pinegrow.com
PhotoLine: pl32.com
ON1 Photo RAW: on1.com/products/photo-raw
QuarkXPress: quarkxpress.com
Sketch: sketchapp.com
Waveform: tracktion.com/products/waveform

QuarkXPress is first to create a single PDF compliant to PDF/A and PDF/X-4

| March 2, 2018 | Matthias Guenther

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When creating PDF often two requirements seem to clash:

  1. The PDF needs to be printed (so ideally PDF/X-4)
  2. The PDF needs to be accessible (tagged) and to be archived (so PDF/A)

Why not create two PDF files (one /A and one /X)?

Sure, you could. It’s asking for trouble though, as you archive something that you didn’t print. And you would have to always keep two files.
Why not create a single PDF that complies to both standards?

That is ideal.

And QuarkXPress 2018 is the first graphic app for creative pro’s to create a SINGLE PDF that complies to both standards, PDF/A-2u and PDF/X-4, at the same time. So you can print them and archive them and they are accessible.

QuarkXPress 2018 offers an output setting that create one PDF complying to both PDF/X-4 and PDF/A.

 

About the Author
Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias Guenther bridges the gap between technology and people. Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software. Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup. Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Webinar Showing Major Features of QuarkXPress 2018

| March 1, 2018 | Matthias Guenther

Quark today announced the upcoming Version 2018, the next major version of QuarkXPress.

In this 39 min long webinar, I am showing the highlights of QuarkXPress 2018, like Color Fonts, JavaScript based on V8, Hyphenation Strictness, the new PDF Engine, PDF/A export, creating tagged PDF, unlimited Android Single App creation and more: https://youtu.be/y7nj6qyTGLw

QuarkXPress 2018 will be officially released on May 16, 2018.

 

About the Author
Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias Guenther bridges the gap between technology and people. Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software. Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup. Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Color Fonts – The Next Big Thing in Typography

| February 24, 2018 | Sarah Rector

Since the introduction of OpenType fonts, there hasn’t been a big change in typography. Until color fonts emerged. Their birth probably was in 2010 when Apple added colorful emoji, which we all have been using since on our mobile.

However – due to the lack of color fonts – designers have always been using colorful fonts; mostly by taking an existing font and converting it to boxes and then changing its shape, its outline, adding colors or blends. So they weren’t fonts anymore but looked like type.

“Stroke text” is another use case where designers add a colorful border to live text, often also even dashed or stripped. And working around the issue that kerning and overlapping suddenly needed to be adjusted.

If you want to read more color fonts (or chromatic type) – which are not new; the first production types appeared in the 1840 – then read more about it here: https://ilovetypography.com/2017/04/03/the-evolution-of-chromatic-fonts/.

Color fonts save time!

“For designers, Color Fonts are gold! Think of the time you had to spend in the past taking a plain font shape and then running it through lots of filters and other steps to get a chiseled look; brush strokes, wood, etc. Now you just type!” – Kurt Lang, JKL Studios, when pre-release testing color fonts in QuarkXPress 2018

Color fonts represent a key evolution in typography. They add rich graphic features into font files. And as they behave like standard fonts, once design applications support them, they are easy to use and easily accessible for millions of creatives.

And they are fun!

Color fonts can impact any type of text, can contain multiple colors, shades, textures, blends and transparency. And even animations (ok, now that’s hard to print ;-))

Are there different formats for color fonts?
Yes. There are four different formats and some formats support both vector and bitmap:

Which creative pro applications for print design support Color Fonts?
Full support in Illustrator CC 2018, Photoshop CC 2018 and QuarkXPress 2018. Photoshop CC 2017 was the first application to support bitmap color fonts. With the release Photoshop CC 2018 also vector color fonts are supported.

Illustrator CC 2018 is the first version of Illustrator to support color fonts, both vector and bitmap.

And QuarkXPress 2018 is the first version of QuarkXPress to fully supports color fonts, both bitmap and vector; in the formats SVG, SBIX and COLR.

InDesign CC 2018 added experimental color font support, Adobe calls it a “technology preview feature.” According to a blog entry from Adobe there seems to be output issues with Color Fonts in InDesign: https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/kb/ot-svg-color-fonts.html.

Color Font format support by application:

Can I use them in Print and Web?

Yes. In digital publishing (browsers, apps), color fonts have been around for a while. We all use them (e.g. emoticons).

In Print – if the application fully supports it – color fonts can be used too, colors are RGB and can be color managed using ICC-based color management. Similar to how an RGB image is color managed.

Where can I get some color fonts?

Here are some 100+ sample color fonts to download: http://typodermicfonts.com/colorfont/

The Typodermic Color Font Experiment is a free collection of 105 color fonts in the very latest color font formats, licensed for commercial use. These fonts can’t be installed and used in applications like normal fonts can…that’s why they’re experimental. Read the documentation to find out more. …and more! 105 fonts in total! (Please read their license agreement first.)

More fonts can be found here: https://creativemarket.com/blog/color-fonts

Enjoy!

More background info

To learn more about QuarkXPress and Color Fonts, visit: www.quark.com/quarkxpress

 

About the Author
Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias Guenther bridges the gap between technology and people. Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software. Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup. Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Largest Community College Newspaper is Designed with QuarkXPress

| January 2, 2018 | Matthias Guenther

Campus News, the largest community college newspaper in the world, is designed using the professional desktop publishing software QuarkXPress.

“It’s a wonderful program,” publisher Darren Johnson, who also is a college communications faculty member, said. “I teach Adobe InDesign, but prefer QuarkXPress in my professional life. It’s faster, more intuitive and creates a perfect PDF. Campus News wouldn’t have survived for so long without it.”

Campus News is an award-winning publication that hits 37 campuses in the Northeast, proving print isn’t dead among younger people.

Read the complete Campus News story.

About the Author
Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias Guenther bridges the gap between technology and people. Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software. Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup. Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Are subscriptions the new dongles?

| December 9, 2017 | Matthias Guenther

Back in 1997 QuarkXPress introduced a dongle. A dongle is small piece of hardware that controls the legitimate use of the software. It wasn’t a good idea. Therefore Quark stopped using dongles in 2002.

And legitimate users hated dongles, as didn’t appear to be fair. The main reasons probably were:

Is there a difference between subscriptions and dongles?

A software subscription seems to do have the following issues:

What do you think: Are software subscriptions today’s dongles?

 

About the Author
Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias Guenther bridges the gap between technology and people. Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software. Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup. Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

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